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12 Comments

  1. Rita @ The Giggly Bits

    I would have to respectfully disagree with part of this. To be a certified personal trainer, in Canada, through the CSEP you must have a college degree of at least two years that has in depth courses on anatomy, physiology and body bio-mechanics. It’s not a luxury if you want to be a credible trainer and to be involved in a research type setting you’re going to need a four year kinesiology degree or the like.

    The study at home courses that can be done in a few months or weeks at home will maybe get you a job and help you understand things better but I wouldn’t pay for that person’s services, nor would I recommend others do so either. Getting a certification without the in depth understanding of what you’re doing seems a little cart before the horse. As you said, there’s just so much that can go wrong with the human body when following uninformed fitness advice and suing is one thing that you may be at risk for. Education plus experience and being mentored by knowledgeable trainers and coaches is entirely the way to go, I do agree with you there.

    Possibly part of the problem in the States is that there are so many certifications available instead of a national standard like we have up here. It’s more straight forward. Just doing a quick search of your certifications and the requirements made my head spin. Let that be a warning to people hiring a trainer too, you should do you home work, get references and check them out.

  2. Skyler Meine

    The key is the practical experience. Understanding anatomy, physiology, and bio-mechanics is going to give you the base to understand the issues involved with properly training an individual and assessing their needs. Spending time with qualified trainers learning how to correct and improve the mechanics of the client is invaluable.

    Individuals looking for a fitness coach should be aware of their experience and education.

  3. mac

    Skyler, do you know enough about the three US certifying organizations to make recommendations? What certificates do you hold? I know they are secondary because of your degree, but was wondering what you would choose if you were someone say, like me :)?

  4. Skyler Meine

    NASM is the certification course that I chose and I recommend it to all of my assistant trainers. I prefer it over the other programs because it address the dysfunctions you may have at each joint and the cause. It teaches some but not all of the ways to correct the issues.

    The general consensus among the trainers I have affiliated myself with is that NASM is the best. Many of them have certifications from all three of the ones I named.

    For some reason it is popular within the fitness coaching industry to talk about all the certifications that you hold. I think that one certification is fine. From there I would start attending Perform Better Summits and then find areas of emphasis for your training. You will find plenty of training material from trainers that have practical experience in whatever area you are seeking to gain more knowledge and experience with.

  5. Brian Walpole

    Great post! With the fitness industry on an all-time high, there is no dearth of people working as personal trainers, many of whom are merely amateurs, with some experience in the gym but with no recognised qualifications. This is the biggest mistake any aspiring personal trainer can make as, without certification, it’s impossible to taste real success in the fitness industry. The main reason why clients prefer certified trainers is the credibility factor. Taking the time and efforts to earn your qualifications from an accredited source indicates to them that you mean business and are genuinely interested in and committed to your chosen profession. Read on for more reasons why getting certified is imperative for every personal trainer http://lovefitnesseducation.com/2012/11/07/why-clients-prefer-certified-personal-trainers/

  6. Steve

    Great post! With the fitness industry on an all-time high, there is no dearth of people working as personal trainers, many of whom are merely amateurs, with some experience in the gym but with no recognised qualifications. This is the biggest mistake any aspiring personal trainer can make as, without certification, it’s impossible to taste real success in the fitness industry. Being friendly and really caring about clients is an often overlooked personality trait that will determine your long term success in this industry. I write about how to get your personal training certification at my website come visit us!

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